Publications

Dr. Stanley Luchters defended his thesis entitled: "Opportunities for targeted HIV prevention in Kenya" in November 2008 successfully.

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This study evaluated the microflora in root canals of necrotic teeth after radiotherapy of the head and neck region. The microbial composition of samples taken from necrotic root canals in patients treated with irradiation of the head and neck (group A, n = 13) and in healthy controls (group B, n = 11) was analyzed by terminal restriction fragment-length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis. A total of 50 different terminal restriction fragment lengths (T-RFs) (each representing one or more bacterial species) were detected in the T-RFLP profiles, 44 in group A and 28 in group B. A mean of 13.2 T-RFs per sample were detected in group A and 6.6 T-RFs were present per sample for group B (p

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In 2007 staff from the International Centre for Reproductive Health (ICRH), a WHO Collaborating Centre, gathered in Belgium to discuss
the impact of research on policy making, and how to bridge the gap between research and policy. This research is based
on the principle that research needs to be applied and operational. The ICRH research unit is a multidisciplinary team
of scientific collaborators who are actively involved in research, services delivery and training in the field of SGBV.

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Despite many improvements, cervical cancer screening is still subject to shortcomings. Diagnostic accuracy may improve by using molecular biological techniques, requiring RNA of superior quality.

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Background: Most studies of the vaginal microflora have been based on culture or on qualitative molecular techniques. Here we applied existing real-time PCR formats for Lactobacillus crispatus, L. gasseri and Gardnerella vaginalis and developed new formats for Atopobium vaginae, L. iners and L. jensenii to obtain a quantitative non culture-based determination of these species in 71 vaginal samples from 32 pregnant and 28 non-pregnant women aged between 18 and 45 years.

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Human papillomavirus (HPV) plays a critical role in the carcinogenesis of squamous cervical carcinoma. Integration of viral DNA into the host genome is a major contributing factor to malignant transformation.

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