Family Planning Knowledge, Attitude and Practice among Married Couples in Jimma Zone, Ethiopia

abstract
Background: Understanding why people do not use family planning is critical to address unmet needs and to increase contraceptive use. According to the Ethiopian Demographic and Health Survey 2011, most women and men had knowledge on some family planning methods but only about 29% of married women were using contraceptives. 20% women had an unmet need for family planning. We examined knowledge, attitudes and contraceptive practice as well as factors related to contraceptive use in Jimma zone, Ethiopia.

Methods: Data were collected from March to May 2010 among 854 married couples using a multi-stage sampling design. Quantitative data based on semi-structured questionnaires was triangulated with qualitative data collected during focus group discussions. We compared proportions and performed logistic regression analysis. Result: The concept of family planning was well known in the studied population. Sex-stratified analysis showed pills and injectables were commonly known by both sexes, while long-term contraceptive methods were better known by women, and traditional methods as well as emergency contraception by men. Formal education was the most important factor associated with better knowledge about contraceptive methods (aOR = 2.07, p<0.001), in particular among women (aOR(women) = 2.77 vs. aOR(men) = 1.49; p<0.001). In general only 4 out of 811 men ever used contraception, while 64% and 43% females ever used and were currently using contraception respectively.

Conclusion: The high knowledge on contraceptives did not match with the high contraceptive practice in the study area. The study demonstrates that mere physical access (proximity to clinics for family planning) and awareness of contraceptives are not sufficient to ensure that contraceptive needs are met. Thus, projects aiming at increasing contraceptive use should contemplate and establish better counseling about contraceptive side effects and method switch. Furthermore in all family planning activities both wives' and husbands' participation should be considered.

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Authors & affiliation: 
Tizta Tilahun1*., Gily Coene2., Stanley Luchters3,4., Wondwosen Kassahun1., Els Leye3., Marleen Temmerman3., Olivier Degomme3. 1 College of Public Health and Medical Sciences, Jimma University, Jimma, Ethiopia, 2 Rhea, Research Center on Gender and Diversity, Brussels University, Bussels, Belgium, 3 International Centre for Reproductive Health, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium, 4 Burnet Institute, Monash University, Victoria, Australia
Ranking: 
Published In: 
PLOS ONE. 8(4)
ISBN: 
1932-6203
Publication date: 
Monday, April 1, 2013
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