Publications

Background: The vaginal microflora is important for maintaining vaginal health and preventing infections of the reproductive tract. The rectum has been suggested as the major source for the colonisation of the vaginal econiche. Methods: To establish whether the rectum can serve as a possible bacterial reservoir for colonisation of the vaginal econiche, we cultured vaginal and rectal specimens from pregnant women at 35-37 weeks of gestation, identified the isolates to the species level with tRNA intergenic length polymorphism analysis (tDNA-PCR) and genotyped the isolates for those subjects from which the same species was isolated simultaneously vaginally and rectally, by RAPD-analysis. One vaginal and one rectal swab were collected from a total of each of 132 pregnant women at 3537 weeks of gestation. Swabs were cultured on Columbia CNA agar and MRS agar. For each subject 4 colonies were selected for each of both sites, i.e. 8 colonies in total.

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Background: Group B streptococci (GBS), or Streptococcus agalactiae, are the leading bacterial cause of meningitis and bacterial sepsis in newborns. Here we compared different culture media for GBS detection and we compared the occurrence of different genotypes and serotypes of GBS isolates from the vagina and rectum.

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Aim Quantitative evaluation of the effect caused by vaginal administration of gelatin capsules loaded with starch pellets and lyophilized powder, respectively, on vaginal pH and microflora.

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Non-disintegrating microcrystalline cellulose pellets (MCC) and disintegrating starch-based pellets were evaluated as new vaginal drug delivery forms and compared with a powder formulation. Pellets and powder were packed in a HPMC or hard gelatine capsule and vaginally administered to five series of five healthy volunteers. Distribution and retention of the multi-particulate formulation was monitored by colposcopy and swabbing. Capsule disintegration in the vagina was slow. MCC pellets clustered around the fornix 3 h after administration, and after 24 h only a few pellets were detected in the vaginal cavity.

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Background: Despite their antimicrobial potential, vaginal lactobacilli often fail to retain dominance, resulting in overgrowth of the vagina by other bacteria, as observed with bacterial vaginosis. It remains elusive however to what extent interindividual differences in vaginal Lactobacillus community composition determine the stability of this microflora. In a prospective cohort of pregnant women we studied the stability of the normal vaginal microflora (assessed on Gram stain) as a function of the presence of the vaginal Lactobacillus index species (determined through culture and molecular analysis with tRFLP).

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conference Expert Group Meeting on good practices in legislation to address harmful practices against women
Location: Addis Ababa, Ethiopia 2009-05-25 - 2009-05-28

Overview of legislation in the European Union to address female genital mutilation, challenges and recommendations for the implementation of laws
Expert paper prepared by: Els Leye and Alexia Sabbe - International Centre for Reproductive Health - Ghent University, Belgium

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