Publications

Since 1985, a caesarean section rate of 10–15% has been deemed optimum by the international health-care community.1 When caesarean section rates rise towards 10% across a population, maternal and newborn deaths decrease; when they are higher than 15%, there is no evidence of reduced mortality.1 Complications of caesarean sections can be substantial and sometimes permanent for both mothers and babies, and can result in disability or death, especially in settings with inadequate facilities or capacity to undertake safe surgery and treat surgical complications.

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Objectives: Female genital mutilation (FGM) is becoming more widely seen in the West, due to immigration and population movement. Health services are being confronted with the need to provide care for women with FGM. One of the more recent trends is the provision of clitoral reconstruction. It remains unclear, however, what constitutes good practice with regard to this type of surgery.

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Background: Early effects of HPV (human papillomavirus) vaccination are reflected by changes observable in young women attending cervical cancer screening.

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Background:
Intimate partner violence (IPV) among adolescents is common worldwide, but our understanding of perpetration, gender differences and the role of social-ecological factors remains limited.

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BACKGROUND: Intimate partner violence (IPV) among adolescents is common worldwide, but our understanding of perpetration, gender differences and the role of social-ecological factors remains limited.

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Family planning (FP) interventions aimed at reducing population growth have negligible during the last two decades in Pakistan. Innovative FP interventions that help reduce the growing population burden are the need of the hour. Marie Stopes Society - Pakistan implemented an operational research project - ‘Evidence for Innovating to Save Lives’, to explore effective and viable intervention models that can promote healthy timing and spacing of pregnancy in rural and under-served communities of Sindh, Punjab and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa provinces of Pakistan.

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Background: Family planning (FP) interventions aimed at reducing population growth have negligible during the last two decades in Pakistan. Innovative FP interventions that help reduce the growing population burden are the need of the hour. Marie Stopes Society - Pakistan implemented an operational research project - ‘Evidence for Innovating to Save Lives’, to explore effective and viable intervention models that can promote healthy timing and spacing of pregnancy in rural and under-served communities of Sindh, Punjab and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa provinces of Pakistan.

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Maternal and infant mortality remain unacceptably high in sub-Saharan Africa, despite the fact that evidence-based interventions and strategies have been devised and are being implemented.
Implementation of and access to these evidence-based interventions alone does not guarantee improved health outcomes. This will only be possible if the quality of the existing antenatal, childbirth, and postpartum care is sufficiently high to provide adequate management and treatment and to encourage utilisation of the provided care.

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